White-bridled finch (Melanodera melanodera)

loading
Adult male white-bridled finch, subspecies melanodera, feeding on seeds
loading
Loading more images and videos...

White-bridled finch fact file

White-bridled finch description

KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPasseriformes
FamilyEmberizidae
GenusMelanodera (1)

The white-bridled finch is a strongly-patterned passerine comprising two geographically isolated subspecies that differ notably in appearance. Male birds of both subspecies have conspicuous white lines above and below the eye that recall the shape of a horses bridle, and outline black lores and a large black throat patch (2) (3). In addition, both have a greyish-blue crown and nape, greyish-olive back and rump, and greyish-yellow underparts (2) (4). However, while the male of the nominate subspecies Melanodera melanodera melanodera has mostly olive wings, M. m. princetoniana has predominately bright yellow wings, hence the alternative common name of canary-winged finch (2) (3). In contrast with the males, females of both subspecies have much duller brown plumages (2) (4).

Also known as
black-throated finch, Canary-winged finch.
Size
Length: 15 cm (2)
Top

White-bridled finch biology

The white-bridled finch has a heavy bill adapted to feeding on a wide variety of seeds. Nests are made from fine grass, and hidden amongst dense ground vegetation or in crevices (4). Breeding occurs from November to February on the mainland (6), and from September to December on the Falklands, with three to four eggs laid in each brood (4).

Top

White-bridled finch range

Melanodera melanodera melanodera is endemic to the Falklands Islands, while M. m. princetoniana occurs in southern Chile and southern Argentina (3) (5).

Top

White-bridled finch habitat

The white-bridled finch is found in dry grasslands, pasture and around settlements on the mainland, and in grass-heath communities on the Falklands (5).

Top

White-bridled finch status

Classified as Least Concern (LC) on the IUCN Red List (1).

IUCN Red List species status – Least Concern

Top

White-bridled finch threats

While the subspecies M. m. melanodera on the Falklands Islands is thought to be thriving, the mainland subspecies M. m. princetoniana is thought to be declining (4) (5). The primary cause of the mainland population’s decline is believed to be over grazing (4) (5) (6).

Top

White-bridled finch conservation

There are currently no known conservation measures in place for the white-bridled finch, but its range falls within the Southern Patagonia EBA (Endemic Bird Area) within which there are several protected areas (7).

View information on this species at the UNEP World Conservation Monitoring Centre.
Top

Find out more

To find out more about the Southern Patagonia EBA see:

Top

Authentication

This information is awaiting authentication by a species expert, and will be updated as soon as possible. If you are able to help please contact:
arkive@wildscreen.org.uk

Top

Glossary

Lores
The space between a bird's bill and eyes.
Subspecies
A population usually restricted to a geographical area that differs from other populations of the same species, but not to the extent of being classified as a separate species.
Top

References

  1. IUCN Red List (May, 2009)
    http://www.iucnredlist.org
  2. Ridgely, R.S. and Tudor, G. (1989) The Birds of South America, Volume I: The Oscine Passerines: Jays, Swallows, Wrens, Thrushes and Allies, Vireos, Wood-warblers, Tanagers, Icterids and Finches. The University of Texas Press, Austin.
  3. Pearman, M., Imberti, S., Mazar Barnett, J. and Henry, A. (2007) Change the English name of Melanodera melanodera from Canary-winged Finch to White-bridled Finch. Proposal (#296) to South American Classification Committee, 0. Available at:
    http://www.museum.lsu.edu/~remsen/SACCprop296.html
  4. Birds of the Falkland Islands (May, 2009)
    http://www.seabirds.org/falklands/birds/bf.htm
  5. BirdLife International (May, 2009)
    http://www.birdlife.org/datazone/species/index.html?action=SpcHTMDetails.asp&sid=9469&m=0
  6. Imberti, S. (2003) Notes on the distribution and natural history of some birds in Santa Cruz and Tierra del Fuego provinces, Patagonia, Argentina. Cotinga, 19: 15 - 24.
  7. BirdLife International (May, 2009)
    http://www.birdlife.org/datazone/ebas/index.html?action=EbaHTMDetails.asp&sid=63&m=0
X
Close

Image credit

Adult male white-bridled finch, subspecies melanodera, feeding on seeds  
Adult male white-bridled finch, subspecies melanodera, feeding on seeds

© Kevin Maskell / naturalvisions.co.uk

Natural Visions
6 Vicarage Hill
Farnham
Surrey
GU9 8HJ
United Kingdom
Tel: +44 (0) 1252 716 700
Fax: +44 (0) 1252 727 464
info@naturalvisions.co.uk
http://www.naturalvisions.co.uk/

X
Close

Link to this photo

ARKive species - White-bridled finch (Melanodera melanodera) Embed this ARKive thumbnail link ("portlet") by copying and pasting the code below.

Terms of Use - The displayed portlet may be used as a link from your website to ARKive's online content for private, scientific, conservation or educational purposes only. It may NOT be used within Apps.

Read more about

X
Close

MyARKive

MyARKive offers the scrapbook feature to signed-up members, allowing you to organize your favourite ARKive images and videos and share them with friends.

Play the Team WILD game:

Team WILD, an elite squadron of science superheroes, needs your help! Your mission: protect and conserve the planet’s species and habitats from destruction.

Conservation in Action

Which species are on the road to recovery? Find out now »

This species is featured in:

This species is affected by global climate change. To learn about climate change and the species that are affected, visit our climate change pages.

Help us share the wonders of the natural world. Donate today!

Blog RSS