Speckled footman moth (Coscinia cribraria bivittata)

loading
Speckled Footman
loading
Loading more images and videos...

Speckled footman moth fact file

Speckled footman moth description

KingdomAnimalia
PhylumArthropoda
ClassInsecta
OrderLepidoptera
FamilyArctiidae
GenusCoscinia

This species of moth is very variable in the colouration and markings of the upper, or forewings. They can range from pale grey and white to dark brown striations and blotches, and can be mistaken for the thistle ermine moth Myelois cribrella.

Size
Wingspan: 30 – 40 mm
Top

Speckled footman moth biology

The moths emerge in July and are on the wing throughout the next two months. They favour a number of herbaceous plants as food sources for their caterpillars, including dandelion. The caterpillars are small and coloured with dark grey, almost black, spiky hairs. They hatch in September and overwinter until early spring.

Top

Speckled footman moth range

The Speckled Footman is scattered across Europe as far south as the Mediterranean and into North Africa, and eastwards as far as Siberia. In the UK, it was once widespread but, since 1990, has only been recorded from heaths in Dorset.

Top

Speckled footman moth habitat

This is, essentially, a heathland species, favouring dry habitats with plenty of its food plants, which include various species of grass.

Top

Speckled footman moth status

Classified as Vulnerable in the UK.

Top

Speckled footman moth threats

Heathland has been a threatened habitat for years, through losses to agriculture, urban development, and forestry planting as well as fires and drainage projects.

Top

Speckled footman moth conservation

The Speckled Footman moth is listed as a priority species under the UK Biodiversity Action Plan, and is included in English Nature's Species Recovery Programme. In order to safeguard the species’ future in the UK, it is vital that its true status is established. The action plan recommends that a full survey of its former sites be undertaken and genetic testing carried out to determine whether the subspeciesbivittata is endemic to Britain. Only then will it be decided if a re-introduction programme using captive-bred British moths should be carried out, or whether moths introduced from the continent could be used. It may even be proved that individuals from the continent migrate to the UK and interbreed with the resident moths.

The UK Biodiversity Action Plan for this species is available at UK BAP.
View information on this species at the UNEP World Conservation Monitoring Centre.
Top

Find out more

The UK BAP Species Action Plan is available on-line at:
http://www.ukbap.org.uk

Top

Authentication

Information supplied by English Nature.

http://www.english-nature.org.uk

Top

Glossary

Endemic
A species or taxonomic group that is only found in one particular country or geographic area.
Subspecies
A different race of a species, which is geographically separated from other populations of that species.
Top

References

X
Close

Image credit

Speckled Footman  
Speckled Footman

© David Green / British Butterfly Conservation Society Ltd

Butterfly Conservation
Manor Yard
East Lulworth
Wareham
Dorset
BH20 5QP
United Kingdom
Tel: +44 (0) 1929 400 209
info@butterfly-conservation.org
http://www.butterfly-conservation.org/

X
Close

Link to this photo

ARKive species - Speckled footman moth (Coscinia cribraria bivittata) Embed this ARKive thumbnail link ("portlet") by copying and pasting the code below.

Terms of Use - The displayed portlet may be used as a link from your website to ARKive's online content for private, scientific, conservation or educational purposes only. It may NOT be used within Apps.

Read more about

X
Close

MyARKive

MyARKive offers the scrapbook feature to signed-up members, allowing you to organize your favourite ARKive images and videos and share them with friends.

Play the Team WILD game:

Team WILD, an elite squadron of science superheroes, needs your help! Your mission: protect and conserve the planet’s species and habitats from destruction.

Conservation in Action

Which species are on the road to recovery? Find out now »

Help us share the wonders of the natural world. Donate today!

Blog