Sea slater (Ligia oceanica)

loading
Sea slater climbing over pebble
loading
Loading more images and videos...

Sea slater fact file

Sea slater description

KingdomAnimalia
PhylumArthropoda
ClassCrustacea
OrderIsopoda
FamilyLigiidae
GenusLigia (1)

The common sea slater is a sea-shore relative of woodlice that can grow up to 3 cm in length (3). It has a flattened, oval-shaped body that is grey to olive in colour and twice as long as it is broad. It has long antennae, seven pairs of walking legs and two projections at the tip of the abdomen, known as uropods. The black eyes are very large and obvious, and are similar to the compound eyes found in insects (4).

Size
Length: up to 3 cm (2)
Top

Sea slater biology

The common sea slater is an omnivore, and emerges at night to feed on seaweed and detritus (2). Maturity has been recorded to occur by one year of age, but in most cases breeding will not begin until the sea slater is at least two years old. Breeding takes place in spring and summer. Most individuals only breed once, and have a life span of around two and a half to three years (2).

Top

Sea slater range

This species has a wide distribution in north-west Europe (2). In Britain, it is common on coasts with rocky substrata (4).

You can view distribution information for this species at the National Biodiversity Network Gateway.
Top

Sea slater habitat

Found on rocky coasts beneath stones and in crevices on the upper shore (2).

Top

Sea slater status

Not threatened (2).

Top

Sea slater threats

This species is not threatened at present.

Top

Sea slater conservation

Conservation action is not required for this species (4).

There may be further information about this species available via the National Biodiversity Network Gateway.
Top

Find out more

Ballerstedt, S., (2002) Ligia oceanica. Common sea slater. Marine Life Information Network: Biology and Sensitivity Key Information Sub-programme [on-line]. Plymouth: Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom. Available from:
http://www.marlin.ac.uk/species/Ligiaoceanica.htm

Top

Authentication

This information is awaiting authentication by a species expert, and will be updated as soon as possible. If you are able to help please contact: arkive@wildscreen.org.uk
Top

References

  1. National Biodiversity Network Species Dictionary (January, 2004)
    http://www.nhm.ac.uk/nbn
  2. Fish, J.D. and Fish, S. (1989) A student’s guide to the seashore. Unwin Hyman Ltd, London.
  3. Gibson, R., Hextall, B. and Rogers, A. (2001) Photographic guide to the sea and shore life of Britain and north-west Europe. Oxford University Press, Oxford.
  4. Ballerstedt, S., (2002) Ligia oceanica. Common sea slater. Marine Life Information Network: Biology and Sensitivity Key Information Sub-programme [on-line]. Plymouth: Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom. (November, 2003)
    http://www.marlin.ac.uk/species/Ligiaoceanica.htm
X
Close

Image credit

Sea slater climbing over pebble  
Sea slater climbing over pebble

© Sinclair Stammers / naturepl.com

Nature Picture Library
5a Great George Street
Bristol
BS1 5RR
United Kingdom
Tel: +44 (0) 117 911 4675
Fax: +44 (0) 117 911 4699
info@naturepl.com
http://www.naturepl.com

X
Close

Link to this photo

ARKive species - Sea slater (Ligia oceanica) Embed this ARKive thumbnail link ("portlet") by copying and pasting the code below.

Terms of Use - The displayed portlet may be used as a link from your website to ARKive's online content for private, scientific, conservation or educational purposes only. It may NOT be used within Apps.

Read more about

X
Close

MyARKive

MyARKive offers the scrapbook feature to signed-up members, allowing you to organize your favourite ARKive images and videos and share them with friends.

Play the Team WILD game:

Team WILD, an elite squadron of science superheroes, needs your help! Your mission: protect and conserve the planet’s species and habitats from destruction.

Conservation in Action

Which species are on the road to recovery? Find out now »

This species is featured in:

This is a UK rocky shore species. Visit our habitat page to learn more.

Help us share the wonders of the natural world. Donate today!

Blog