Ochre-fronted antpitta (Grallaricula ochraceifrons)

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Ochre-fronted antpitta in wild habitat
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Ochre-fronted antpitta fact file

Ochre-fronted antpitta description

KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPasseriformes
FamilyFormicariidae
GenusGrallaricula (1)

Discovered in 1976, this little-known bird has only been recorded in a small area of inaccessible cloud forest on the eastern slope of the Andes (3). The male ochre-fronted antpitta has, as its name suggests, an ochre coloured face and eye-ring. The female is less deserving of the name, with the brown crown having only a faint wash of ochre. The upperparts are chiefly olive-brown, with buff-tinged flanks, and the underparts are white and heavily streaked with black (2). The ochre-fronted antpitta belongs to the antbird family, called so because many of the species follow army ants, preying on the insects and small animals that they flush out (4).

Spanish
Tororoi de Frente Ocrácea.
Size
Length: 10.5 cm (2)
Weight
22.5 – 23.8 g (2)
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Ochre-fronted antpitta biology

There is nothing known of the behaviour or ecology of the ochre-fronted antpitta, due to a lack of observations, which may be indicative of its rarity (2).

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Ochre-fronted antpitta range

Occurs in the central Andes of Peru, in the regions of Amazonas and San Martin (2).

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Ochre-fronted antpitta habitat

The ochre-fronted antpitta has been found in the dense undergrowth of humid-wet montane forest, between elevations of 1,890 and 1,980 meters (2).

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Ochre-fronted antpitta status

Classified as Endangered (EN) on the IUCN Red List 2006 (1).

IUCN Red List species status – Endangered

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Ochre-fronted antpitta threats

Habitat loss and degradation is likely to pose the greatest threat to the ochre-fronted antpitta, due to its presumed restricted range and specific needs. Whilst much of the area in which it inhabits is inaccessible and unexplored, in other parts, deforestation occurs at an alarmingly high rate, as forest is cleared for crops such as marijuana and coffee (5). Slash-and-burn agriculture in the area is also increasing, catalysed by the recent paving of a highway that traverses the region (6).

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Ochre-fronted antpitta conservation

The ochre-fronted antpitta has been found near the Alto Mayo Protected Forest (2), but this area is itself critically threatened due to deforestation for agriculture and grazing, illegal extraction of wildlife, high levels of human migration and indiscriminate hunting (7). The American Bird Conservancy, together with Asociación Ecosistemas Andinos (ECOAN), is running a project to conserve threatened birds and other wildlife around Abra Patricia, (a site within the antpitta’s range), by establishing a new private reserve and field station (6). In addition, it has been proposed that surveys and research of the species should be undertaken, along with enforcing the protection of the Alto Mayo Protected Forest and ensuring that high-altitude forest habitat, suitable for the antpitta, is included within its boundaries (2) (3).

View information on this species at the UNEP World Conservation Monitoring Centre.
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Find out more

For further information on the ochre-fronted antpitta see Birdlife International:
http://www.birdlife.org/datazone/species/index.html?action=SpcHTMDetails.asp&sid=5112&m=0

For further information on the Abra Patricia project see the American Bird Conservancy:
http://www.abcbirds.org/abcprograms/international/action/abrapatricia.html

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Authentication

This information is awaiting authentication by a species expert, and will be updated as soon as possible. If you are able to help please contact:
arkive@wildscreen.org.uk

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Glossary

Slash-and-burn
The cutting and burning of forests or woodlands to create space for agriculture or livestock.
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References

  1. IUCN Red List (January, 2007)
    http://www.iucnredlist.org
  2. del Hoyo, J., Elliott, A. and Sargatal, J. (2003) Handbook of the Birds of the World. Vol. 8: Broadbills to Tapaculos. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.
  3. Birdlife International (June, 2007)
    http://www.birdlife.org/datazone/species/index.html?action=SpcHTMDetails.asp&sid=5112&m=0
  4. Burnie, D. (2001) Animal. Dorling Kindersley, London.
  5. Birdlife International (June, 2007)
    http://www.birdlife.org/datazone/ebas/index.html?action=EbaHTMDetails.asp&sid=50&m=0
  6. American Bird Conservancy (September, 2009)
    http://www.abcbirds.org/abcprograms/international/action/abrapatricia.html
  7. ParksWatch (June, 2007)
    http://www.parkswatch.org/parkprofile.php?l=eng&country=per&park=ampf
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Image credit

Ochre-fronted antpitta in wild habitat  
Ochre-fronted antpitta in wild habitat

© Daniel J. Lebbin / American Bird Conservancy

Dr Daniel Lebbin
dlebbin@abcbirds.org

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