Helmet vanga (Euryceros prevostii)

loading
Helmet vanga on branch
loading
Loading more images and videos...

Helmet vanga fact file

Helmet vanga description

KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPasseriformes
FamilyVangidae
GenusEuryceros (1)

Vangas are a family of birds restricted to Madagascar. The most striking feature of the helmet vanga is its large, deep and pale blue bill (2). This bird is largely black in colour, but the back, rump and central tail feathers are chestnut. Juveniles have a pale brown bill and are brownish in colour (2). A fluty pepepewpew call is produced (2).

French
Eurycère de Prévost.
Size
Length: 28 - 31 cm (2)
Top

Helmet vanga biology

Little is known of the life-history of this shy vanga (3). They frequently join mixed-species flocks with other large vangas and feed on a range of invertebrates including large insects, snails, spiders and crabs as well as lizards (3). Prey items are taken from branches and tree trunks and from the ground (2).

Top

Helmet vanga range

This species, like all vangas is endemic to Madagascar, where it is found only in the northeast (3). It has a small and patchy distribution (2).

Top

Helmet vanga habitat

Occurs in humid evergreen rainforests at altitudes of below 800m (2).

Top

Helmet vanga status

Classified as Vulnerable (VU B1+2bce) on the IUCN Red List 2003 (1).

IUCN Red List species status – Vulnerable

Top

Helmet vanga threats

The Madagascan low-altitude forest favoured by this species is highly threatened by clearance for agricultural demands and timber extraction (2). The helmet vanga has a small range; its population is highly fragmented and suffering rapid decline (2).

Top

Helmet vanga conservation

The helmet vanga occurs within a number of national parks and reserves, and so its habitat receives a level of protection at these sites (2). As so few details are known of this vanga’s life history, there is an urgent need for research into its ecology and the threats facing the species before dedicated conservation action can get underway (2).

View information on this species at the UNEP World Conservation Monitoring Centre.
Top

Find out more

BirdLife International 2003 BirdLife’s online World Bird Database: the site for bird conservation Version 2.0. Cambridge, UK: BirdLife International:
http://www.birdlife.org/

Top

Authentication

This information is awaiting authentication by a species expert, and will be updated as soon as possible. If you are able to help please contact: arkive@wildscreen.org.uk
Top

Glossary

Endemic
A species or taxonomic group that is only found in one particular country or geographic area.
Top

References

  1. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2003 (March, 2004)
    http://www.redlist.org
  2. BirdLife International 2003 Birdlife’s online World Bird Database: the site for bird conservation Version 2.0. Cambridge, UK: BirdLife International (March, 2004)
    http://www.birdlife.org/
  3. Photospot: helmet vanga – African Bird Club (March, 2004)
    http://www.africanbirdclub.org/feature/hvanga.html
X
Close

Image credit

Helmet vanga on branch  
Helmet vanga on branch

© Nick Garbutt / naturepl.com

Nature Picture Library
5a Great George Street
Bristol
BS1 5RR
United Kingdom
Tel: +44 (0) 117 911 4675
Fax: +44 (0) 117 911 4699
info@naturepl.com
http://www.naturepl.com

X
Close

Link to this photo

ARKive species - Helmet vanga (Euryceros prevostii) Embed this ARKive thumbnail link ("portlet") by copying and pasting the code below.

Terms of Use - The displayed portlet may be used as a link from your website to ARKive's online content for private, scientific, conservation or educational purposes only. It may NOT be used within Apps.

Read more about

X
Close

MyARKive

MyARKive offers the scrapbook feature to signed-up members, allowing you to organize your favourite ARKive images and videos and share them with friends.

Play the Team WILD game:

Team WILD, an elite squadron of science superheroes, needs your help! Your mission: protect and conserve the planet’s species and habitats from destruction.

Conservation in Action

Which species are on the road to recovery? Find out now »

Help us share the wonders of the natural world. Donate today!

Blog