Glionnetia (Glionnetia sericea)

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Glionnetia sericea flowers
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Glionnetia fact file

Glionnetia description

KingdomPlantae
PhylumTracheophyta
ClassMagnoliopsida
OrderRubiales
FamilyRubiaceae
GenusGlionnetia (1)

Numerous clusters of cream, pink, or maroon flowers against a background of dark evergreen leaves makes Glionnetia sericea one of the most attractive trees of the Seychelles (2). The leathery, oval-shaped leaves, which grow up to 20 centimetres long, have red stalks and edges (3). The flowers of Glionnetia sericea are tubular and sweetly scented (3), and grow in clusters that are creamy pink at first, becoming deeper pink and maroon as they age (2). The spherical fruit, measuring six millimetres long (3), splits vertically when mature to release seeds (2).

Synonyms
Randia sericea.
Size
Height: up to 6 m (2)
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Glionnetia biology

There is no information available on the biology of Glionnetia sericea.

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Glionnetia range

Occurs in the Seychelles, on the islands of Mahé and Silhouette (3).

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Glionnetia habitat

Glionnetia sericea requires moist, humid conditions and grows in exposed habitats at altitudes above 600 metres (2).

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Glionnetia status

Glionnetia sericea is classified as Endangered (EN) on the IUCN Red List (1).

IUCN Red List species status – Endangered

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Glionnetia threats

Invasion of alien species such as Psidium cattleianum and Cinnamomum verum is the main threat to this species, causing competition for resources and habitat degradation. Other threats to Glionnetia sericea include wildfires and poor regeneration, with no observable reproduction in certain areas, while its restricted range makes it particularly vulnerable to extinction. Glionnetia sericea is particularly threatened on the island of Mahé, where its population is on the verge of extinction (1).

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Glionnetia conservation

Glionnetia sericea is found in the Morne Seychellois National Park, a protected area. This species should be given high priority for conservation as it is endemic to the Seychelles and is a unique species, being the only member of its genus (1).

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Find out more

For further information on biodiversity and conservation in the Seychelles see:

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Authentication

This information is awaiting authentication by a species expert, and will be updated as soon as possible. If you are able to help please contact:
arkive@wildscreen.org.uk

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Glossary

Endemic
A species or taxonomic group that is only found in one particular country or geographic area.
Genus
A category used in taxonomy, which is below ‘family’ and above ‘species’. A genus tends to contain species that have characteristics in common. The genus forms the first part of a ‘binomial’ Latin species name; the second part is the specific name.
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References

  1. IUCN Red List (January, 2012)
    http://www.iucnredlist.org
  2. Wise, R. (1998) A Fragile Eden. Princeton University Press, Princeton, New Jersey.
  3. Robertson, S.A. (1989) Flowering Plants of Seychelles. Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew.
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Image credit

Glionnetia sericea flowers  
Glionnetia sericea flowers

© Christopher Kaiser-Bunbury

Christopher Kaiser-Bunbury
c.kaiser-bunbury@biology.au.dk

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