Beadlet anemone (Actinia equina)

KingdomAnimalia
PhylumCnidaria
ClassAnthozoa
OrderActinaria
FamilyActiniidae
GenusActinia (1)
SizeDiameter at base: up to 50 mm (2)

The beadlet anemone is not currently thought to be under any threats (2).

The beadlet anemone is the most familiar sea anemone in Britain. When disturbed or exposed to air at low tide it appears as a bright red blob of jelly (3), but when feeding up to 192 beautiful stinging tentacles emerge, arranged in 6 circles around the mouth. The smooth ‘body’ of the anemone, correctly known as the column, is usually bright red but may be greenish or brown, with blue, green or yellow spots. There is often a brilliant blue line around the adhesive base, and bright blue spots (known as acrorhagi) containing stinging cells are located at the top of the column (2).

Very common on most rocky shores of Britain. Elsewhere, this species is found from the White Sea in Russia to the West coast of Africa, and is found in the Canary Islands and the Mediterranean (4).

This anemone attaches to hard surfaces and is found from the upper to lower shore, down to depths of 20 m (2). It can also tolerate brackish water and may be found in estuaries (1).

The beadlet anemone is extremely well-adapted to life on the shore, and is able to withstand desiccation and fluctuations in temperature (2). Prey is caught with the stinging tentacles and passed to the mouth (3). Although often thought of as sessile animals, they are able to move by sliding the base along the substratum. They have even been shown to slowly move away from predators such as sea-slugs when facing attack (2). Amazingly, they are even aggressive to neighbouring beadlet anemones. When the tentacles of two adjacent anemones come into contact, one will sting the other, leading to the other individual being forced to move away (1).

Beadlet anemones are either male or female, but it is not yet understood if sexual reproduction occurs. Both sexes are known to brood offspring internally before giving birth to live young. It is thought that the offspring are produced asexually by a process of internal ‘budding’. However, some experts believe that sexual reproduction leading to pelagic larvae may take place in some situations (2).

There are not known to be any specific threats to the beadlet anemone.

There are not known to be any specific conservation measures currently in place for the beadlet anemone.

For more on this species see:

Ager, O.E.D. (2001) Actinia equina. Beadlet anemone Marine Life Information Network: Biology and Sensitivity Key Information Sub-programme. [On-line]. Plymouth: Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom. [cited 27/11/2003]. Available on-line at:
http://www.marlin.ac.uk/species/Actiniaequina.htm

This information is awaiting authentication by a species expert, and will be updated as soon as possible. If you are able to help please contact:
arkive@wildscreen.org.uk

  1. Ager, O.E.D. (2001) Actinia equina. Beadlet anemone Marine Life Information Network: Biology and Sensitivity Key Information Sub-programme. [On-line]. Plymouth: Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom. (November, 2003)
    http://www.marlin.ac.uk/species/Actiniaequina.htm
  2. Fish, J.D. and Fish, S. (1989) A student’s guide to the seashore. Unwin Hyman Ltd., London.
  3. Buczaki, S. (2002) Fauna Britannica. Hamlyn, London.
  4. Gibson, R., Hextall, B. and Rogers, A. (2001) Photographic Guide to the Sea & Shore Life of Britain and North-west Europe. Oxford University Press, Oxford.